Coagulation Agreement

The view that the coagulation process is a „cascade“ or „cascade“ was expressed almost simultaneously by MacFarlane[25] in Britain and by Davie and Ratnoff[26] in the United States. Clotting begins almost immediately after an injury to the endothelian that dresses a blood vessel. Exposure of blood to the subotothelial space is the cause of two processes: changes in blood platelets and exposure of subentothelial tissue factor to plasma factor VII, which ultimately leads to interconnected fibrinization. Platelets immediately form a plug at the place of injury; This is called primary hemostasis. Secondary hemostasis occurs simultaneously: additional clotting factors (coagulation) beyond factor VII (below) cascade to form strands of fibrinst that amplify the platelet plug. [1] In the previous paragraphs, we found that the dependence of coagulation on the wall untiding rate is highly non-linear. We were also able to show that this phenomenon does not depend much on our assumptions and activation conditions. The next step was to identify the chemical mechanism responsible for this behavior of the coagulation system under flow conditions. As a first approach to identify critical elements of the system that are influenced by current, we performed virtual experiments where individual clotting factors were not carried by the current. To „extinguish“ their convection, we removed the respective convection levels from the equations of these factors (see model description). This approach allowed some clotting factors to „ignore“ the flow, thus illustrating the relative contribution of their convection. The red line in Figure 4a represents the same dependence of the deceleration time on the wall deceleration rate in a non-convection model of all cyclogenes (i.e.

factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, fibrinogens). doi.org/10.1186/1752-0509-4-5 clotting, also called clotting, is the process by which blood turns from a liquid into a gel and forms a blood clot. It can lead to hemostasis, the end of blood loss from a damaged vessel, followed by repair. The coagulation mechanism includes platelet activation, adhesion and aggregation, as well as fibrin deposition and maturation. Coagulation: Coagulation occurs as a result of coagulation transmitted by blood clotting factors. Blood clot factors are inactive forms of. We propose the following explanation of the observed phenomena: The beginning of coagulation under flow conditions is determined by the positive feedback of extrinsic activation of tenase by factor Xa. . . .